11132019What's Hot:

The Latest: Hong Kong protests planned as groups slam police

HONG KONG (AP) – The Latest on the Hong Kong extradition bill and protests (all times local):

3:15 p.m.

A noted Hong Kong political analyst says the pressure on the territory’s chief executive to step down or back away from plans to push through an unpopular extradition bill is growing.

Willy Lam, an expert on Chinese politics at Chinese University of Hong Kong said Friday that Beijing-appointed Chief Executive Carrie Lam may have to compromise on planned legislation that has sparked massive protests.

Willy Lam said the pressure to amend the plan or step down comes from many sectors, including business leaders. The Hong Kong legislature suspended sessions due to protests that turned violent on Wednesday.



She has defended the bill that would allow suspects detained in Hong Kong to be tried in mainland Chinese courts. Critics fear the law could be used to undermine Hong Kong’s civil liberties.

___

1:55 p.m.

Petitions are voicing anger over police use of rubber bullets and other forceful means against Hong Kong residents who turned out to protest a bill that would allow suspects detained in Hong Kong to be tried in mainland Chinese courts.

Several groups were circulating online petitions signed by thousands of people objecting to use of rubber bullets, tear gas and other tactics during protests that left about 80 people injured.

One of the petitions, posted on Change.org, had nearly 28,000 signatures. It said the police had used an “excessive level of violence” and urged the United Nations to investigate and to condemn the police.

More demonstrations are planned to try to stop Beijing-appointed Chief Executive Carrie Lam from pushing through the legal amendments they fear will erode Hong Kong’s legal autonomy.

___

10:20 a.m.

Calm appeared to have returned to Hong Kong after days of protests by students and human rights activists opposed to a bill that would allow suspects to be tried in mainland Chinese courts.

The prospect of further protests over the weekend loomed large, however, with demonstrators saying they were determined to prevent the administration of Beijing-appointed Chief Executive Carrie Lam from pushing through the legal amendments they see as eroding Hong Kong’s cherished legal autonomy.

Traffic flowed on major thoroughfares that had been closed after a protest by hundreds of thousands of people on Sunday, posing the biggest political challenge yet to Lam’s two-year-old government. Protesters had kept up a presence through Thursday night, singing hymns and holding up signs criticizing the police for their handling of the protests.

Copyright © 2019 The Washington Times, LLC.

The Washington Times Comment Policy

The Washington Times welcomes your comments on Spot.im, our third-party provider. Please read our Comment Policy before commenting.

Source: www.washingtontimes.com stories: Politics

comments powered by HyperComments

More on the topic