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MORE: Complete coverage of the U.S.-North Korea summit

But the statement also indicates that Trump is not allowing for a second day of talks with Kim in Singapore.

Updated

SINGAPORE — The White House said Monday that discussions between the U.S. and North Korea “have moved more quickly than expected,” while also apparently removing the possibility — for now — that President Donald Trump’s meeting with Kim Jong Un could extend into a second day.

In a statement sent roughly 12 hours before Trump and Kim are due to sit down, the White House said the two leaders will participate in a one-on-one meeting, accompanied only by translators, to be followed by a “working lunch” with an expanded group of officials. That broader delegation will include National Security Adviser John Bolton, who has chafed the North Koreans with his hawkish and deeply skeptical view of the negotiations.

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Here’s what’s at stake for some of the notable figures connected with the historic meeting.

Here’s what is at stake for some of the notable figures connected with the historic meeting.

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This story is being published by POLITICO as part of a content partnership with the South China Morning Post. It originally appeared on scmp.com on June 11, 2018.

Beijing is expected to take a bigger role in Korean peninsula negotiations after President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un meet on Tuesday – helping the two sides to push forward any deals they make.

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President Donald Trump said Monday morning that there’s “excitement in the air” ahead of his historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

“Great to be in Singapore, excitement in the air!,” the president tweeted just before 10 a.m. in Singapore, where he is staying for the summit.

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Updated

PYONGYANG, North Korea — With all the international attention focused on Singapore and the historic summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Pyongyang must have been buzzing with excitement Sunday, right?

Well, it might have been, if anyone there had known what was going on.

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The who, what, when, where and how of the highly anticipated diplomatic gathering.

President Donald Trump is poised to hold a historic meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Tuesday, the first known face-to-face between a sitting U.S. president and a head of the Asian country.

The summit is the culmination of months of posturing and negotiating between top U.S. and North Korean officials and comes less than two weeks after Trump reversed his decision to scrap plans for the meeting, which is set to take place in Singapore.

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Updated

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s comments after the G-7 meeting were particularly hurtful to President Donald Trump ahead of his historic negotiations with the leader of North Korea, a White House adviser said Sunday.

Speaking in an interview on CNN, White House National Economic Council Director Larry Kudlow blasted Trudeau for holding a press conference after the G-7 meeting during which the Canadian leader said Canadians “will not be pushed around.” Soon after the press conference, Trump said the U.S. would not endorse the G-7 communique agreed to on Saturday. Trump arrived in Singapore late Sunday.

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U.S.-North Korea Summit

The shift from Nobel Prize chatter to ‘we’ll see’ will help the president declare the Singapore summit a win, whatever happens.

Updated

SINGAPORE — As anticipation for his historic summit with North Korea has ratcheted up, salesman in chief Donald Trump has done something out of character: ratcheted expectations down.

Less than two days before his tête-a-tête with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the president who initially welcomed the idea that his efforts might net him a Nobel Prize was downplaying the possibility that Tuesday’s meeting would lead to any major breakthroughs.

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President Donald Trump on Sunday arrived in Singapore where he will participate in a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Air Force One arrived at 8:30 p.m. local time. The president was greeted by a delegation from Singapore, including Minister of Foreign Affairs Vivian Balakrishnan, as he left the plane.

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U.S.-North Korea Summit

The president has abandoned what he says was a fatally flawed nuclear deal with Iran, but former U.S. officials contend he’ll be lucky to get a similar agreement with North Korea.

Days before President Donald Trump embarked on a North Korea summit meant to solve one nuclear crisis, Iran hinted at another.

The Islamic Republic announced last week that it has expanded its ability to enrich uranium, a key ingredient for nuclear weapons. The move came just weeks after Trump abruptly quit the Barack Obama-era deal that largely dismantled Iran’s nuclear program, and it could be a first step toward an eventual Iranian dash to a nuclear bomb.

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U.S.-North Korea Summit

The official program may include meeting with Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, sources say, ahead of landmark summit with President Donald Trump

Updated

This story is being published by POLITICO as part of a content partnership with the South China Morning Post. It originally appeared on scmp.com on June 9, 2018.

North Korean leader Kim Jong-un is due to arrive in Singapore around late afternoon on Sunday and will have his own official program on Monday that could include a meeting with Singaporean Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, sources told the South China Morning Post.

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Foreign Policy

After tense exchanges with allies before the G-7, the president looks forward to meeting the leaders of North Korea and Russia.

President Donald Trump is confounding foreign policy norms by turning his back on some of America’s closest friends — even as he reaches out to longtime U.S. rivals.

Trump arrived at the G-7 summit in Canada on Friday as an outcast among close U.S. allies exasperated over his recent foreign policy moves, from exiting the Iran nuclear deal to slapping tariffs on their exports.

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It’s time for Episode 110 of the Nerdcast, POLITICO’s podcast on the White House and politics. Tune in each week to geek out with us as we dive deep into the political landscape and the latest numbers that matter.

Subscribe and rate the Nerdcast on Apple Podcasts.

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The president says the June 12 summit in Singapore could yield a major breakthrough — or be a bust.

Updated

President Donald Trump on Thursday said he didn’t feel a need to prepare for his historic June 12 meeting with North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong Un, arguing that the high-stakes nuclear talks would be based more on “attitude” than advance legwork.

At the same time, Trump insisted that the event would “not be just a photo-op,” and reiterated demands that the North “denuclearize” in return for concessions like an end to U.S. sanctions.

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Thursday called reports of a rift on North Korea between himself and national security adviser John Bolton “a complete joke,” even as he acknowledged that the two advisers to President Donald Trump were likely to “disagree with great consistency over time.”

During the White House press briefing, Pompeo was asked to explain the extent of his disagreements with Bolton on North Korea amid reports the two officials have clashed on their approaches to negotiating with the North’s government. Pompeo, a leading figure in the ongoing discussions with the country’s leader, Kim Jong Un, and other North Korean officials, framed his disputes with Bolton as ordinary differences of opinion.

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President Donald Trump said Thursday he hopes and expects to normalize relations with North Korea “when everything is complete,” the latest indication the U.S. may be willing to ease off its harsh economic sanctions or move toward more regular diplomatic dealings as part of its talks on denuclearization.

“Normalizing relations is something that I would expect to do, I would hope to do, when everything is complete,” Trump said of North Korea during a bilateral press conference with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in the Rose Garden. “We would certainly hope to do that.”

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U.S.-China trade talks have bounced between Washington and Beijing in recent weeks, but the real breakthrough could happen after President Donald Trump meets with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore.

Trump has consistently linked his trade demands on China with the Asian nation’s willingness to help check North Korea’s nuclear ambitions. And though Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross returned from a trip to Beijing without any deals to announce, senior administration officials appear upbeat about the direction of the talks, according to one administration source.

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Foreign Policy

Trump’s overseas friends are learning the hard way that handshakes and golf games can’t convince Trump not to smack would-be allies.

Call it friends without benefits.

Foreign leaders are learning that hand-holding, golf games, military parades and other efforts to personally woo President Donald Trump do not guarantee that Trump won’t burn them on key policy issues.

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White House

After two months on the job, Trump’s new national security adviser has not called a single Cabinet-level National Security Council meeting on North Korea.

Updated

National security adviser John Bolton has yet to convene a Cabinet-level meeting to discuss President Donald Trump’s upcoming summit with North Korea next week, a striking break from past practice that suggests the Trump White House is largely improvising its approach to the unprecedented nuclear talks.

For decades, top presidential advisers have used a methodical process to hash out national security issues before offering the president a menu of options for key decisions. On an issue like North Korea, that would mean White House Situation Room gatherings of the secretaries of state and defense along with top intelligence officials, the United Nations ambassador, and even the Treasury secretary, who oversees economic sanctions.

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