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Alex Jones, right-wing media wastes no time politicizing Manchester bombing

Alex Jones has an opinion about the devastating bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester Monday night, and it’s probably what you expect it to be.

The Infowars founder called the victims, many of whom were children and teenagers, “a bunch of liberal trendies.” He added that that the victims were, “The same people — God love them — on average, who are promoting open borders, bringing Islamists in.”

Jones never has a shortage of theories that are too often cruel and hurtful, but as the broadcast continued, it became clear that the Manchester victims were just a tool for Jones to to promote President Donald Trump’s divisive policies.

“Trump’s been blocking that and saying you don’t come here from unvetted countries,” Jones said.

Other right-wingers have wasted zero time politicizing the attack as well. Former CIA director James Woolsey visited Fox News and said:

I think the radical Islamists, and I would call them that, have decided to pick up the pace with the terrorist attacks, and I think we’ll probably see some more. And we now have a president who is pretty straightforward that he is at war with them. He’s not going to soft-pedal that. He calls them ‘evil,’ and we haven’t had a situation like that. We did not have, in the eight years of the Obama administration, a president who wanted to fight and win a war, and—

That caused host Shepard Smith to push back: “Mr. Woolsey, with great respect, it’s very early to make this a political matter.”

On a “Fox and Friends,” host Brian Kilmeade used the bombing to say that Trump is not “anti-Muslim.”

“That’s why the president of the United States, who clearly is showing the Muslim world he is not anti-Muslim, was saying, if most of the terrorists are coming from these nations who can’t identify who is coming here, at least there’s got to be a pause to protect the American people,” he said. “It seems almost logical.”

Tucker Carlson showed no qualms about transitioning the moment from a place of mourning to politics, when he asked British politician and political analyst Nigel Farage, about the effect of the attack on the upcoming Britain election.

“Now, there are 16 days to go,” Farage responded. “If it were to turn out that this attack, let’s say for argument’s sake, had been taken place by somebody who’s been fighting with ISIS in Syria and had returned home, then it clearly has the potential to change the way people think and to change the whole debate.”

Rachel Leah.

Source: Salon: in-depth news, politics, business, technology & culture > Politics

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